Tag Archives: tick bite

Lyme Disease and Borrelia Mayonii

Lyme disease is enough to scare people into tick-repellent and caution against hiking in the woods unprotected, but scientists have just discovered a new bacterium which causes Lyme Disease.

Westchester Tree Life Tick Safety

Scientists from Rochester, Minnesota’s Mayo Clinic have reported a new bacterium which has recently begun to make people sick.  While Borrelia burgdorferi is the predominant causative agent in Lyme Disease, Mayo Clinic scientists have discovered a new genome of bacteria now called Borrelia mayonii (“Mayonii” pays homage to the scientists of the Rochester, MN Mayo Clinic.

The Symptoms of Borrelia mayoniiWestchester Tree Life

Similar to Borrelia burgdorferi, researchers believe Borrelia mayonii is also transmitted to humans through black-legged ticks (commonly known as deer ticks).  The symptoms of Borrelia mayonii are:

  • nausea and vomiting
  • diffuse rashes (rather than a single bull’s-eye rash associated with Lyme Disease)
  • higher concentration of bacteria in the blood

Treatment of Borrelia mayonii

Patients infected with Borrelia mayoni who underwent treatment for their symptoms recovered.  Treatment included antibiotics used to treat Lyme disease.

The CDC recommends that health care providers who are caring for patients infected with Borrelia mayonii follow the antibiotic regimen described by the infectious Diseases Society of America.

Read more about Borrelia mayonii from this informative NPR article, here.

5 Tick Safety Tips Everyone Should Know

The window for tick bites has been extended this year due to November and December 2015 having been unusually warm and damp.  Enjoy the weather outdoors in Westchester County while staying safe with these 5 safety tips everyone should know!

  1.  Tick repellent clothing is a great way to enjoy Westchester County’s beautiful weather while protecting yourself from tick bites!
    Tick Repellent Socks

    Tick Repellent Socks, Gamehide.com

    Tick repellent clothing is pre-treated with tick repellent which is odorless and lasts up to 70 washes.

  2. Contrary to popular belief, ticks remain active during winter.  This is important to remember if you are a skier, hunter, outdoor enthusiast or work outdoors, tick prevention is still a precaution you should take.
    Winter Ticks

    “Deer ticks will be active any winter day that the ground is not snow-covered or frozen.” – TickEncounter.org

    Deer ticks in the adult stage of their life cycle become active after the first frost, and are not killed by freezing temperatures.

  3. Ticks do not jump or fly, they climb up.  Ticks climb to access thinner blood located near the neck, head and ears of their host.
  4. Ticks come in small, medium and large sizes; this includes deer ticks.  Ticks have three active, blood-feeding stages which include larvae (the size of a grain of sand), nymphs, (the size of a poppy seed) and adults (the size of an apple seed).  Ticks which are larger than an apple seed are most likely partially-full or full of blood.
  5. Pointy tweezers are the best way to remove a tick.  When pulling a tick out, grab as close to the skin as you can and pull upward with steady, even pressure.Tick Removal