A Helpful Guide on Planting New Trees!

Now that summer has arrived we are all spending more time outside in our yards! As you walk around you may start to feel like it is time for some new growth on your property. Let’s take a look at planting new trees and how to NOT let the process overwhelm you! By following some simple guidelines you can have new trees growing in your yard! Location and proper care are vital to successful growing, let’s take a look!

So When is the Best Time to Plant?

When thinking about planting new trees there are several factors to keep in mind. To achieve a healthy grow cycle trees are ideally planted during the dormant season (fall and early spring before the buds start). This is important because it allows the new trees to establish strong roots in its new location before the spring rains and high heat of summer force a strong top growth. A sturdy house is built upon a sturdy foundation! You can plant in the warmer seasons if you are using “balled” or container trees but it is vital that these trees receive appropriate care in order for them to thrive. It is very important that they are properly watered if planted in warmer growing conditions. Just be careful with balled/container trees because they lose a large portion of their root system at the nursery which can result in “Transplant Shock”. Transplant shock slows the potential growth of the root system, especially when some of the roots have to be cut due to kinked or entwined roots. To avoid or lessen the transplant shock you should take steps to pick out a prime location and provide constant “follow-up” care to your new tree.]

 

Let’s take a look at some important factors to consider when planting your new trees. First, and foremost: Make sure to identify all underground wiring before you dig ANYWHERE in your yard!

When digging the hole for planting be sure to make it 2-3 times wider than your new tree’s root ball and make the hole is as deep as the actual root ball. It is key to dig a broad hole so the new roots have room to expand and the broken up soil allows for this to happen. Once your hole is ready you should remove the containers or cut away the wire root casing.  Closely inspect the root balls for circling roots and be sure to straighten, cut, or remove them. Expose the trunk flare, if need be.

Wait, “trunk flare”?  What’s this? Trunk flare is where the trunk expands, visibly,  at the base of the tree. This area should be partially visible after the tree has
been planted. Be sure to remove all the excess soil from the top of the root ball prior to planting if the trunk flare is not visible.  If the tree is planted too deep, new roots will have a tough time developing because of a lack of oxygen. Also, in poorly drained
or heavily clayed soils, trees should be planted with the base of the trunk flare 2 to 3 inches above grade. And always remember to lift the tree by the root ball…not the trunk!

 

 

 

Once your new tree is in the hole be sure to quickly straighten it up. It helps to have another set of eyes view this new tree from several different angles and distances to ensure the tree was planted straight. Once the tree is firmly planted it will be very difficult to reposition it. Once you are happy with your new tree’s position you can stake it if needed. Some simple follow-up care will help your tree grow strong and healthy. You should lay mulch around the new growth area because this will help retain the much needed moisture as the new roots begin their exploration. Keep the mulch away from the trunk of the tree to prevent rapid decaying and have your mulch layer be 2-4 inches deep. Keep the mulch 1-2 inches away from the trunk to prevent bark decay.

 

 

Keep the new soil moist but be sure not to over-water. In general it is good to water the new tree 1-2 times per week depending on the amount of rain you receive. A little extra water is a good idea if you are in a hot weather spell. Continue this watering schedule regularly until the fall and then start to taper off because lower temperatures require less frequent watering.  You can prune your new tree but do so sparingly. Remove any damage areas that occurred during planting. Delay necessary corrective pruning until a full season of growth in the new location has occurred. The last step is VERY IMPORTANT: Enjoy your new tree! Yes, that’s the last step! When you have questions regarding your tree, be sure to contact your local ISA Certified Arborist or a tree care or garden center professional for assistance!

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.