Gorgeous Hydrangeas

Curating the perfect garden is an art.  Selecting which flowers, shrubs and trees to integrate can be difficult.  Gorgeous hydrangeas always make for a wonderful addition; here’s why.

Hydrangea Westchester Tree Life

Beautiful Bushels of Flowers

Westchester Tree Life Hydrangea

Did you know Westchester Tree Life can help customize a plant health care plan just for you?

Hydrangeas bloom from spring to late fall.  Their tiny flowers grow in clusters and can be pink, purple, blue and cream.  The cool thing about hydrangeas is how easy it is to manipulate their color; all you have to do is control the pH of the soil.  If you would like your hydrangeas to yield pink blooms, you can raise the pH of the soil with limestone.  Lowering the pH with elemental sulfur will result in blue flowers.

Healthy Hydrangeas

Westchester Tree Life can assist with your soil! Call today: (914) 238-0069

Westchester Tree Life can assist with your soil! Call today: (914) 238-0069

Whether you prefer your hydrangeas potted or planted, well drained soil is key.  If you are planting hydrangeas, dig a hole slightly larger than the plant.  This will result in loose, pliable soil.  If you are potting hydrangeas, do not plant any deeper than one inch above the original pot height.  Select a place where your hydrangea can get a little bit of morning sun as well as afternoon shade.

All About Lilacs

The sweet, soothing fragrance a lilac bush emits is wonderful.  In addition to their signature scent, lilacs are also a lovely ornamental addition to your Westchester property.  Unsure whether this is the right plant for your property?  Read all about lilacs here.

All About Lilacs Westchester Tree Life

All About Lilacs

One of the reasons we love lilacs, is because they are a versatile addition!  Lilacs can grow as medium to large shrubs, or small trees; the tallest a lilac will get is approximately 20 feet.  You can tell the maturity of a lilac by inspecting its bark.  A mature lilac will have gray-brown bark, while a young lilac will have green-brown bark.  Being a deciduous plant, lilacs lose their leaves annually.  Lilac Westchester County Tree Care

Did You Know?

Did you know there are over 1,000 varieties of lilac bushes and trees?  The key to keeping your lilacs looking their best is knowing which variety is best for you.

Planting a Lilac

Westchester Tree Life Planting Lilacs

Lilacs thrive in fertile, well-drained soil.  When inspecting your designated planting site, keep in mind that lilacs prefer humus-rich, neutral to alkaline soil, as well.  Ideally this spot will have a minimum of 6 hours of broad sunlight for your plant to thrive in.

Blooming

Lilacs Westchester Tree Life

The lilac can produce clusters of lavender, purple, pink or white blooms.  Despite having a three-week window for flowering (which occurs during springtime), varieties such as the Josee or the Boomerang can bloom multiple times a year.  View House Beautiful’s list of Lilac facts here.

Ensure your lilac is planted properly and has a plant health care plan to maintain its beauty with help from Westchester Tree Life.  Call Westchester Tree Life today (914) 238-0069

Spring Gardening Checklist

Spring is officially here!  Our Spring Gardening Checklist makes preparing your Westchester home for warm weather easy.

Spring Gardening Checklist

Westchester Spring Gardening Checklist

Each homeowner’s spring gardening checklist will vary.  Before you create your spring gardening checklist, write down any goals you have for your Westchester property.  Consider long term and short term goals for your yard.

Walkways & Walls

Spring Gardening Checklist Westchester Tree Life

Westchester county’s past snowstorms may have taken a toll on your yard’s walkways and walls.  Check your stone walkways and walls for damaged or missing pieces.  This is the perfect time to re-position your yard’s layout.

Tree Removal

Tree Stump Grinding Westchester Tree Life

Westchester Tree Life can professionally remove that unsightly tree stump from your yard.

Spring cleaning is the perfect time to remove that dead tree or stubborn tree stump from your yard!  Westchester Tree Life’s certified arborists can offer tree removal and tree stump grinding services.  Request a consultation online here.

Tree & Shrub Planting

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Let Westchester Tree Life take care of tree and shrub planting this year!

Trees can provide the perfect amount of privacy, while adding aesthetic appeal.  If tree and shrub planting seems overwhelming to you, our team of professional arborists can help!  We can assist you in selecting the best trees and shrubs for your yard, and provide a customized plant health care plan for you.  View all of Westchester Tree Life’s services here.

Garden Shed Organization

Spring Gardening Checklist

Storage Secrets for Your Garden Shed, bhg.com

Don’t forget to add garden shed organization to your spring garden checklist!  Starting the season with a tidy workspace will entice you to spend more time outdoors.  Throw away any tools which are broken, clean and stack gardening pots, and keep additional potting soil and mulch on hand.  Check out Better Homes & Gardens’ “Storage Secrets for Your Gardening Shed” article here.

Leafing Out…Spring has sprung!

The first hint of green signals that spring is coming.  Once trees have begun leafing out, we know that spring Westchester county has sprung.  How do trees know when to bud leaves?  What happens if trees bud too early?

Leafing Out Westchester Tree Life

Dormant Trees

Dormant Winter Trees

Trees are dormant throughout winter.  During dormancy, a tree’s metabolism comes to a standstill due to low temperatures and lack of sunlight.  Dormant trees are not dead, they are simply in a state of rest, as they await spring’s warmth.

Budding Trees:  How Do Trees Know When to Bloom

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A look at different tree buds via Naturally Curious with Mary Holland

Did you know that your tree’s buds were most likely formed last summer?  It’s true!  These pre-formed buds are protected during winter dormancy by “bud scales”.

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Tree buds are formed during summer and protected by “budding scales” through winter dormancy; via Wikipedia

The date your trees will begin budding depends on a variety of factors.  Factors which effect a tree’s budding cycle include temperature, location and tree type.  You can tell a tree is about to bud when weather becomes consistently warmer, and the days longer.  As nights shorten, the changing levels of the photoreceptor phytochrome triggers the trees to bloom.

Leafing Out:  Early Bloomers

Leafing Out Trees Westchester Tree Life

Call Westchester Tree Life’s professional arborists for a plant health care plan, if your trees are blooming too early!

Early blooming occurs when warm temperatures plunge.  This temperature shock can stress your trees out, potentially damaging new growth.  If fruit and flower buds bloom too early, there is a chance they might not bloom again later in the year, while leaf buds are likely to bounce back.  If you are concerned about your tree budding too early, call Westchester Tree Life!

Why We Love the Dogwood Tree

Spring is here and it’s almost time for your dogwood trees to start blooming!  The dogwood tree is a lovely ornamental tree that is easily identifiable by its bark.  Here are some reasons why we love the dogwood tree.

Blooms from a dogwood tree via Pinterest

The tree’s beautiful blooms up close via Pinterest

Landscape Design:  Bright Blooms

A beautiful dogwood tree via dogwoodtree.org

Instant curb appeal via dogwoodtree.org

Add a pop of color to your Westchester home by planting one or two dogwood trees.  These trees grow anywhere from 20 to 30 feet and feature white, pink or red blooms!  A blooming dogwood is a signal that winter has passed and spring has truly begun.  During fall, the these trees yields red and purple leaves and red berries.

Distinctive Bark

The bark of a dogwood tree via CarolinaNature.com

The bark of a dogwood tree via CarolinaNature.com

The distinctive bark of a dogwood tree sets it apart.  The bark of a dogwood tree is often compared to the texture of an alligator.  This is because the gray bark begins to crack into tiny squares once the tree has matured.

 

The Drought Tolerant Dogwood 

The Japanese dogwood tree via arborday.org

The Japanese dogwood tree via arborday.org

Though the most popular species of dogwood tree is the Cornus florida, the Japanese dogwood, Cornus kousa, happens to be more drought tolerant.  The Japanese dogwood can handle more sun, which is ideal for some homeowners.

Anatomy of a Tree

How knowledgeable are you when it comes to the anatomy of a tree?  Being able to identify parts of a tree is helpful in identifying tree illnesses and safety hazards.  Tweet your tree anatomy questions at us: “@westchestertree”.

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Starting from the Bottom:  The Root System

A healthy root system makes for a healthy tree!  The purpose of the tree’s root system is to anchor the tree, as well as absorb water and minerals from the soil.  There are two kinds of roots, large perennial roots and small, short-lived “feeder” roots.

Did You Know:  Tree roots are typically found in the top three feet of soil.

The Five Parts of a Tree Trunk

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Did you know a tree trunk has five parts?  A tree trunk is comprised of the outer bark, the inner bark, the cambium cell layer, sapwood and heartwood!  

The heartwood is the innermost layer of the tree trunk, and acts as the supporting pillar of the tree.  Though the heartwood is technically dead, it does not decay or lose strength while the outer layers of the tree are intact.  Heartwood is a composite of hollow, needlelike cellulose fibers which are bound together by a chemical-like glue, lignin, making it almost as strong as steel.

The layer which covers the heartwood is the sapwood, which later hardens and turns into heartwood.  Sapwood acts as the trees pipeline for water, helping it move up to the tree’s leaves.

After the sapwood is the cambium cell layer.  The cambium cell layer annually produces new barn and wood in response to auxins, the hormones which are passed down through the tree.  Auxins stimulate growth in cells and are produced by leaf buds at the ends of a tree’s branches.

Next is the Phloem, or the inner bark, which acts as the pipeline for food.  The Phloem only lives for a short time before turning to cork; this cork is part of the tree’s protective outer bark.

Lastly is the outer bark, which protects the tree from the outside world.  This outermost later helps keep out moisture and prevents the tree from losing moisture; the outer bark also insulates against extreme temperatures.

Branches, Twigs and Leaves

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A tree’s branches and twigs spring out of the trunk and are the supportive structure for leaves, flowers and fruit.  Through the process of photosynthesis, leaves make food for the tree and release oxygen into the air.

How Trees Are Damaged During Construction

Winter is the perfect time to begin planning your upcoming spring projects and renovations.  If you are considering tackling a construction project near your home or residence, try to keep the surrounding trees in mind to avoid potential damage.  Here are a few ways trees are damaged during construction.

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Do you have tree care questions? Call Westchester Tree Life!

Trunk and Crown Injury

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Westchester Tree Life serves all of Westchester county.

Did you know construction equipment can injure the portion of your trees which sit above ground?  Branch breakage, wounds to the trunk and tearing of the tree bark are all ways your tree can become injured during a construction project.  To avoid permanent or fatal injuries to your tree, ask your team to be mindful of their equipment, or mark a barrier.

Root Damage

tree-root-system

This diagram helps to explain how nutrients move through a tree’s system, beginning with the root system.

Construction which is tearing up ground or affecting the ground can potentially damage your tree’s roots!  Your tree’s root system is vital, as it absorbs water and minerals from the soil and sends them up the trunk to nourish the tree.  When planning construction, try to cut as far away from the tree as possible; a good rule of thumb is to steer clear of working underneath the tree’s crown.  

Did You Know:  Damage to a tree’s roots can affect its ability to stand upright during storms, causing potential danger and property damage.

Soil Compaction

soil-compaction

Soil that has not been compacted vs. compacted soil via Mother Earth News

Be aware that heavy construction equipment can cause soil compaction.  This reduces pore space which is necessary for water and air movement.  Soil compaction can halt root growth, limit water absorption and penetration and decrease oxygen.

For more information on how trees are damaged during construction, check this guide from Trees Are Good.

Tree Facts: Forest, Air and Climate

Protecting and preserving Earth’s natural forests is a pivotal step in ensuring a healthy environment.  Check out some of these cool tree facts explaining how trees affect the forest, air and climate.  Tweet your tree facts at “@westchestertree” and join the conversation!

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How Trees Affect Air Quality

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We produce carbon dioxide simply by breathing; one mature tree absorbs carbon dioxide at a rate of 48 pounds per year!  It takes two mature trees to provide enough oxygen for one person to breathe for a full year.  What’s even more amazing, is that in one year, an acre of forest can absorb twice the C02 emissions which are produced by the average car’s annual mileage.

How Trees Affect Climate

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Earth has experienced a major shift in temperature since 1880, and most warming has occurred in the past 35 years.  Global temperature rise, warming oceans, shrinking ice sheets and declining Arctic sea ice are just a few repercussions of global warming.  Deforestation is a major variable in global warming; 15 percent of global emissions of heat-trapping gasses are attributed to deforestation.

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How do trees help the climate?  In just one day, a single tree can absorb up to 100 gallons of water, which cools the surrounding area when released into the air.

Forest Facts

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Forests house a variety of insects, plants and animals which are vital in maintaining a well-rounded food chain.  When a forest is uprooted or destroyed by manmade or natural causes, these insects, plants and animals are left without homes and food.  Deforestation and the decline of forest inhabitants results in a domino-effect of failing eco-systems.

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 Did you know you are directly affected by the benefits of forests?  Forests are the largest forms of carbon storage (also known as sinks) in the United States.  They help to trap dust, ash, pollen and smoke, keeping pollutants out of our lungs!

For more facts on climate change, visit NASA’s Climate Change page here.  To learn more about the benefits of trees, visit American Forests’ forest fact page here.

Common Tree Diseases

The key to maintaining beautiful trees is being able to understand the basics of tree health.  Spot these common tree diseases before they irreversibly ruin your tree’s health with help from our quick guide.

Fire Blight

perdue-university-fire-blight

Fire Blight via Perdue University

You may have noticed fire blight during the summertime, as the bacteria is most active in warm, moist weather.  Trees affected by fire blight appear to have “scorched” branches, leaves and twigs, leaving them brown or black.  This disease can be spread by infected pruning tools, bees and rain.

The solution to fire blight is simple:  prune!  Call your professional arborist as soon as you notice fire blight to prevent it from spreading.  Proper pruning is essential, so be sure to have a professional aborist take care of it.

The Emerald Ash Borer Beetle

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Tree infected by the EAB beetle via The Emerald Ash Borer Resource Guide

Trees infected by the Emerald Ash Borer or EAB beetle are characterized by a thinning or dying crown, and erratic growth along the trunk.  Infected trees often attract woodpeckers, as the birds are harvesting the beetles in the bark.  The sure sign of an EAB infestation/infection are unique “D”-shaped holes where the beetles have exited the trees.

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The EAB via The National Park Service

An EAB infestation is serious and can be spread to other trees in the surrounding area.  Contact Westchester Tree Life at the first sign of an EAB infestation.

Tip:  When you are unable to diagnose what is wrong with your plants, trees or shrubs, call a professional arborist.  Westchester Tree Life can assist by providing a detailed evaluation as well as a plant health care plan to keep you on the right track!

Powdery Mildew

Powdery Mildew Fungi on Pumpkin Leaves

Powdery mildew on pumpkin leaves via Pure Nutrients

Have you noticed powdery mildew accumulating on your leaves?  This white coating forms during dry, cloudy weather with high humidity, and can be caused by a variety of fungi.  You may notice that powdery mildew tends to grow on plants in shaded areas.

To prevent powdery mildew, seek out resistant varieties of trees and shrubs.  Ask your local arborist which available fungicides will work best to protect your plants, trees and shrubs.

3 Signs a Tree Is Dying

Knowing how to properly care for the trees on your property is key when maintaining a safe environment.  A dying tree is a danger to the surrounding buildings, power lines, pedestrians and more; knowing how to spot a dying tree easily can save you from damages.  Here are 3 signs a tree is dying.

Trunk Damage

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When assessing the health of your tree, start at the trunk!  If the damage to a tree’s trunk is sufficient enough, it compromises the future of the tree.  Look for any cracks in the trunk and check the bark; a lack of bark may be a tell-tale sign that your tree is not so healthy.  Though it is normal for a tree’s bark to fall off as it ages, it’s not a good sign if the bark won’t grow back.

Damaged Roots

popular-mechanics

Tree roots can cause thousands of dollars in damage to sewer lines. Prevent plumbing problems by following these tree-planting tips.
via Popular Mechanics

A healthy root system is essential for tree healthy.  The roots are where water and nutrients are absorbed and distributed throughout the tree.  If your tree’s roots aren’t visible, call Westchester Tree Life to assist in your tree care evaluation; we can help spot damage properly.

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A leaning tree; via CBS New York

Is your tree leaning?  A noticeable lean can be a sign of serious root damage.  Leaning trees are a damage to their surroundings, especially during the stress of winter storms.  As ice bears down and wind pushes, the tree can give way and land on a nearby home, business, car or person.

Bare Branches

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If you are concerned a tree on your property is dying, check it’s branches come springtime.  A tree which is not producing leaves is a warning sign.  If you notice that only one side of your tree has dead or dying branches, you may want to have a professional arborist come to check for serious trunk and root damage.

 If you are concerned a tree on your property is dead or dying, call a professional arborist from Westchester Tree Life today at (914) 238-0069.  You can also request a consultation using our online form here.